Is Transhumanism Ethical? A Dilemma for Immortals

Posted: September 18, 2014 in Uncategorized
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With technology, humans will become more than human. But what about those skeptics out there who believe that robots will eventually take over the world and kill off humans? Could they be right?

I’m not sure, but I’d rather become half-robot than dead-human!

To transhumanists, technology will be the key to the survival of human existence and ultimately our immortality. But technology is also which caused today’s current epidemics in the world. Technology spurred overpopulation, if you follow the chain, and caused disease and greed and wealthy economies and poor economies and wealthy families and poor families and more!

Without technology, however, I wouldn’t be able to communicate with you via this blog post. I wouldn’t even exist in your memory. Maybe I’m blabbering, but the future of technology can only go in one direction, and that is UP!

Transhumanists need a way of relaying information to skeptics as to inform them of its benefits. Many of these skeptics believe we shouldn’t mess around with God’s plan for us to die eventually. But many transhumanists are also atheists or agnostics (not all). Transhumanists take their fate into their own hands and make a choice on whether to utilize the technology at their disposal for the good or bad of humankind.

Many technologies transhumanists look forward to can be used in evil ways. Nano-bots are looking to be used to cure cancer by inserting them into the body. These nano-bots would be programmed to “search-and-destroy” all cancerous cells. But….nano-bots could also be programmed by terrorists to spy on governments. Even worse, mass quantities could be programmed to wipe out a country’s entire ecosystem by destroying agriculture, poisoning water supplies, and even infecting specific populations with diseases.

This causes a major problem with speaking about the ethics of transhumanist thought.

With that being said, transhumanism needs help when it comes to the perception of its intentions. How can we make this experience better for the world to understand?

For those Ray Kurzweil’s, Aubrey de Grey’s, and David Pearce’s of the world, I would recommend aiming to change the perception of what transhumanist life could be like. You’ve already got some of us hooked, but let’s go for the skeptics.

First, those pushing a transhumanist agenda need to reach those skeptics by finding them. To do this, research needs to be conducted. Push surveys on websites with transhumanist, biotechnology, or subjects alike. Record demographics, record their views on humanity, record their views on transhumanism. And then find the groups of people based on that data that are skeptical of the intentions of transhumanists.

Second, start reaching out to those people that belong to the demographic you’re targeting as “non-transhumanist” and ask them why they don’t believe transhumanism to be a “good” thing. Ask open-ended questions to receive real responses. Find out their past experiences to understand why that aging and death should not be tampered with, or why humans should not have super-intelligence. Are they afraid that these abilities will get into the wrong hands?

Finally, analyze the data and figure out a way to address the concerns of these skeptics of transhumanism. Companies with technologies of a transhumanist stature should establish programs and processes not just for ethical reasons but because the concerns of skeptics are real and true concerns. We don’t want terrorists to have super-intelligence or access to world-destroying technology. Once there is a plan in place, stress and publicize this plan to those skeptics and the rest of the world on why we can still utilize the power of transhumanist tendencies and still be moral human beings.

Since technological advancement is inevitable (minus the world reaching the apocalypse), these are ethical dilemmas that governments should begin dealing with. But governments do already deal with technology and ethics, correct?

Take for instance the nuclear bomb. We have international governments that routinely make sure that countries with bad intentions do not acquire this technology. We have technology in place to protect our electrical grids from cyber attacks.

All of this is possible with any new technology that is born. The future is scary, but if you won’t have a future and decide to waive your immortality, then should you care about the future of those that do?

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